Winter Blues: Make your home a haven of calm with the surprising colors of the season

Now is the time of year when most of us think of ways to lift our spirits.

As short, dark days continue to become more common, it’s no surprise that online searches for “winter blues” have risen by 500% in the past three months.

But far from being a tone associated with recession, blue is actually highly prized for its grounding and reassuring qualities in the home.

Paint specialist Benjamin Moore recently announced Blue Nova Violet as the color of the year John Lewis & Partners has formulated blue as the color of the season for spring, with a particular focus on powder tones.

The effect: A bedroom of timeless appeal with shades of Bauhaus blue.  Color is valued for its grounding and reassuring properties in the home

The effect: A bedroom of timeless appeal with shades of Bauhaus blue. Color is valued for its grounding and reassuring properties in the home

“It’s timeless and timeless, from deep shades to blurry, desaturated options,” says the series’ color expert Melanie Archer, who has seen searches for “sky blue” rise by 137 percent on the brand’s website.

“Blue evokes an association with the ocean and sky, generating a feeling of calm, tranquility and stability.”

In turbulent times especially, blue, deeply intertwined with our perception of nature, represents safety and security.

Comfort and calm

Once considered an official color used on police and military uniforms as a way of expressing confidence, blue has recently shed its conservative reputation.

This shade features a wide range of shades, making it extremely versatile, whether as a painted background or across wallpaper, furnishings or accessories.

Lighter colors like baby blue and light blue create a feeling of calm and relaxation, while deeper colors like navy blue and royal blue add depth and sophistication.

“I call it neutral fatigue, but we’re embracing rich jewel tones, the likes of which we haven’t seen since the 1970s,” says King Living’s Sebastian Nash.

Upholstered furniture in teal and turquoise adds a sense of sophistication and luxury to the living room decor. Consider using a color like this as you add spirits to a cocktail – just a small measure can make a big impact.’

If you're painting the walls or considering floors blue, think about the direction of the room first

If you’re painting the walls or considering floors blue, think about the direction of the room first

Try upholstering the footstool in a deep blue velvet, introducing blue cushions and curtains into the bedrooms for an elegant look, or repainting the paneling or joinery in an evocative Wedgwood blue.

This is a tone that works brilliantly with bright pinks and terracotta, too, so to update the look, try contrasting painted joinery with pops of organic matter like a berry sill or windowsill, or pair a mustard yellow chair with deep blue walls.

Natural elements, from sisal to rattan, also work great when accented with blue. Such textures create an easy sense of movement.

“I love blue on geometric fabrics, like Traveling Light by Christopher Farr, which is a fresh, modern style,” says interior designer Alice Leigh.

“Velvet, wool, and chunky knits will also help soften the deep blue by adding visual interest and tactile appeal.”

If you’re painting the walls or considering floors blue, think about the direction of the room first.

“Use warmer shades for north- or east-facing rooms and cooler blues for a south- or west-facing room,” advises Poonam Chadha of Carpetright.

“Scientifically proven to boost health and have a positive effect on the mind, I find that blue breathes new life into a home, and brings in optimism and positivity. Blue floors are installed instantly.

In bedrooms, try the Burlington Soft Saxony Carpet in Sky Plain, £45.99 per square metre, for a sense of easy luxury, while the graphic shapes of the Aurora Hexagon Rug, from £79.99, work well in studies, especially since Blue color is mentioned. To enhance focus.

New wave

Both pale and bold options convey a sense of natural balance. Benjamin Moore’s Helen Shaw believes that “blue reflects the desire for adventure and new experiences, coupled with the need to create refuge in our spaces.”

‘Especially with shades of violet, it strikes the perfect balance between mysterious and reassuring. Pairing it with strong colors on the other end of the color wheel, such as orange and red, will create a fun and playful scheme.’

Keep in mind that the medium to marine level works as a brilliantly effective anchor, and works particularly well on woodwork. “We’ve seen a real boom in demand for deep blue for living room cabinetry and dining spaces,” says Rachel Hutchison of Sharps.

“These shades work in the same way as beautiful staples from your wardrobe—versatile enough to be styled up or down to create just the right look and feel.” Dark blue is particularly timeless because it’s a basic base color that acts as a natural foil.’

Sometimes, introducing a few elements of this tone is all that is needed to enhance a feeling of well-being.

Try investing in some new artwork – H&M Home’s Bauhaus Blue poster, from £13.99, adds just the right amount of punch to neutral schemes, while Zara Home’s Blue Floral Earthenware tableware, from £5.99, injects An immediate, spring-like surge.

And for smart everyday elegance, you can’t beat Canvas Home’s Abbesses cutlery set with simple hand-painted blue trim, priced at £25 for a set of four small plates.

This year, embrace the winter blues and you may just emerge with a spring in your step.

Savings of the week Dutch ovens

ProCook offers two Dutch ovens in Deep Red (24cm and 28cm) priced at £149 which is now £129

ProCook offers two Dutch ovens in Deep Red (24cm and 28cm) priced at £149 which is now £129

The Dutch oven, which is a large cast iron casserole with a lid, has a rich history as do the stews and other dishes you can prepare in it.

The Chinese began making these vessels about 2,500 years ago, and these techniques were improved in the Netherlands in the late 17th century.

In 1707, British industrialist Abraham Darby developed a version that he sold as a Dutch oven.

Today, the Dutch oven (often called a casserole) is seeing a rise in popularity because it can be used to prepare and then serve low-cost meals: There are colors to suit every decor.

The French company Le Creuset makes the most popular Dutch oven. Various sizes and colors are available at ecoookshop with the 26cm model in navy blue reduced from £315 to £157.50.

At ProCook, you can find a set of two Dutch ovens in Deep Red (24cm and 28cm) priced at £149 and are now priced at £129.

You can also save £10 on a 20cm model in medium blue which is now £49.

Here’s to warming dinners on cold evenings this winter—and for many winters to come.

Anne Ashworth

(tags for translation) Daily Mail

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